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Outdoor Delaware: Nature



Delaware is full of beauty and wonder. From our insects and animals, to our wild lands and beaches, learn why our natural world is important to all of us.

Close-up of a Tortoise

Hanging with the Bats - Many of us are scared of bats. But they’re far more beneficial than harmful – and they’re not out to get us.
“Not My Trash – But I Picked It Up.”
Coastal Cleanup 2020
- For 32 years, volunteers cleared tons of trash from Delaware beaches in single-day events. In 2020, to make the Coastal Cleanup accessible and safe for everyone, the effort transitioned to a month-long campaign.
Go Herpin’ — Join the Effort to Catalogue Delaware’s Reptiles and Amphibians - You can help us create the first-ever Delaware Amphibian and Reptile Atlas by submitting photos and locations of Delaware’s reptiles and amphibians, or as we call them, “herps.”
Our Own Toliara - Toliara is a radiated tortoise who lives at the Brandywine Zoo. Radiated tortoises are reptiles and considered among the most beautiful in the world. His ancestors emerged on land shortly after dinosaurs became extinct some 65 million years ago.
What About Kestrels? The Brandywine Zoo is Finding Out - The American kestrel is a pint-sized yet ferocious aerial predator notorious for taking out tree swallows or bluebirds in mid-air. About the size of a mourning dove, this raptor is the smallest and most colorful falcon in North America.
Jellyfish to Watch Out For - Are you planning to go for a swim? If so, you may encounter jellyfish because they love warm water. And there are several species of jellies you should keep a watchful eye on as you venture out for a dip.
Wildlife Enthusiasts – Check Out Improved Access to the Bayshore! - Enjoy birding, boating, fishing, hiking, hunting, taking photographs or just watching wildlife in their natural habitats when you visit the Delaware Bayshore. It doesn’t take much effort to find your favorite spot to enjoy some time outdoors.
Everything Including the Kitchen “Sink” — Delaware’s Artificial Reefs - Over 20 years, Delaware has recycled more than two million tons of rock, 100,000 tons of concrete, 86 tanks and armored personnel carriers, 1,329 retired subway cars and 27 retired vessels to create new, artificial reefs.

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