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 Pages Tagged With: "conservation"

Waste not Want Not: What Really Happens to Our Recyclables

Delaware’s Materials Recycling Facility is a 64-thousand-square-foot repurposing facility with state-of-the-art sorting equipment.


Go Herpin’ — Join the Effort to Catalogue Delaware’s Reptiles and Amphibians

You can help us create the first-ever Delaware Amphibian and Reptile Atlas by submitting photos and locations of Delaware’s reptiles and amphibians, or as we call them, “herps.”


Our Own Toliara

Toliara is a radiated tortoise who lives at the Brandywine Zoo. Radiated tortoises are reptiles and considered among the most beautiful in the world. His ancestors emerged on land shortly after dinosaurs became extinct some 65 million years ago.


What About Kestrels? The Brandywine Zoo is Finding Out

The American kestrel is a pint-sized yet ferocious aerial predator notorious for taking out tree swallows or bluebirds in mid-air. About the size of a mourning dove, this raptor is the smallest and most colorful falcon in North America.


Everything Including the Kitchen “Sink” — Delaware’s Artificial Reefs

Over 20 years, Delaware has recycled more than two million tons of rock, 100,000 tons of concrete, 86 tanks and armored personnel carriers, 1,329 retired subway cars and 27 retired vessels to create new, artificial reefs.


Electric Vehicles – On the Move in Delaware

Our relationship with electric automobiles has run hot and cold over the last 100 years, with gas-powered vehicles always winning in the end. Now people are looking for cleaner alternatives as concerns for the environment increase.


Have You Seen Me?

We are mapping sightings of Delmarva fox squirrels and you can help. Use this form to report sightings and share information about this rare species. The Delmarva fox squirrel is no longer classified as an endangered or threatened species at the federal level. But it is still rare in Delaware. We are mapping the


Plants and Plant Communities

Delaware has more than 1,600 species of native plants. More than a quarter of them are rare and can be found in more than 100 different terrestrial and wetland habitat types. The Division of Fish and Wildlife, working with the Water Resources Center, part of the University of Delaware’s Institute for Public Administration, maintains


Become a Shorebird Project Volunteer

Spring brings the shorebird migration season. The Delaware Shorebird Project needs experienced and dedicated volunteers for the field season each spring.

Contact Us

Henrietta Bellman Coastal Avian Biologist 302-735-3600
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Federal Funding for Fish and Wildlife

The Division of Fish and Wildlife uses a combination of federal funds and revenue from recreational licenses and permits to fund wildlife conservation, habitat restoration, public access, hunting, fishing and other services. Delaware receives federal funds from the Wildlife Restoration Act, the Sport Fish Restoration Act, and State Wildlife Grants to support wildlife conservation,


Delaware Bay Ecology

The Delaware Bay is extraordinarily rich in biological resources. The beaches, mudflats, and marshes that line Delaware Bay provide abundant food and habitat for many species.

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Henrietta Bellman Coastal Avian Biologist 302-735-3600



Piping Plover Program

Dwindling populations have landed the Piping Plovers on the federal Endangered Species List. Delaware’s Piping Plover Program monitors these beach-nesting birds, provides habitat protection and educates the beach-going public.

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Henrietta Bellman Coastal Avian Biologist 302-735-3612


Shorebird Research and Monitoring

Each May, the Delaware Shorebird Project carries out its research objectives during the shorebirds’ stopover in the Bay. The brief field season brings long, but rewarding, days on the coast.

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Henrietta Bellman Coastal Avian Biologist 302-735-3600


Osprey Monitoring

Delaware’s osprey population is one of the state’s greatest conservation success stories. From the days of DDT and the collapse of many raptor populations, including bald eagles and peregrine falcons, ospreys in Delaware have rebounded and the population continues to grow and expand state-wide.
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The Delaware Shorebird Project

Shorebirds are an important part of the ecology of Delaware’s shorelines. But they are under threat; populations are declining. The Delaware Shorebird Project works to mitigate that threat, through research and monitoring, habitat protection, and management planning.

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Henrietta


Delaware Wildlife Action Plan

The Division of Fish and Wildlife has created a Delaware Wildlife Action Plan to coordinate wildlife conservation practices in the 21st century. Funds appropriated by Congress through the State Wildlife Grants program require states to demonstrate comprehensive wildlife conservation needs. “Comprehensive” includes all species and all habitats. The federal State Wildlife


Do-it-Yourself Phragmites Control Tips

The Division of Fish and Wildlife offers a phragmites control cost-share program to help landowners control larger stands of phragmites. There are steps landowners can take themselves to control smaller areas of phragmites. Herbicides That Can be Used
Sources for Aquatic Glyphosate


Cost Share Program Questions and Answers

A list of frequently asked questions, and answers, about the phragmites control cost-share program offered by the Division of Fish and Wildlife.

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James Joachimowski Impoundment/Habitat Biologist 302-284-4916
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Operation Terrapin Rescue at Port Mahon

Operation Terrapin Rescue is a volunteer program to help Diamondback terrapins move safely between the Delaware Bay and their nesting sites near Port Mahon. It also collects accurate and valuable data on the terrapins’ movements.

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Nate Nazdrowicz Species Conservation


Environmental Reviews

The Species Conservation and Research Program (SCRP) continuously updates information on rare plant and animal species and vegetation communities in Delaware. The SCRP is the state’s most comprehensive, centralized source of information on rare plants, animals, and vegetation communities.

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Delmarva Fox Squirrel Conservation

The DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife is implementing a conservation plan for the Delmarva fox squirrel. This sub-species of the fox squirrel, found only on the Delmarva Peninsula, is rare in Delaware. As part of the conservation plan, DNREC has begun a project to move squirrels from Maryland into southern Delaware. [column md=”6″


Delaware’s Endangered Species

Native wildlife species that are in danger of becoming extinct in Delaware may be listed as Endangered by the Division of Fish and Wildlife. To help prevent species from becoming endangered, Delaware currently has a Wildlife Action Plan in place for restoring and maintaining important habitats and dwindling populations of the state’s wildlife species.


Facts About Phragmites

Phragmites has been present in Delaware’s marshes for a long time. In fact, research shows that Phragmites (Phragmites australis) has been a part of the wetland ecosystem of North America for over 11,000 years. However, in the 1950s, Phragmites was identified as problematic in North American wetlands as a non-native European hybrid began to wreak


Private Lands Assistance

Delaware is a biologically diverse state with hardwood forests, swamps and coastal marshes that support over 400 species of mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians. Despite significant strides in conservation, much of the wildlife habitat in Delaware remains isolated, degraded and unprotected as more land is converted to urban, commercial and industrial uses. [column md=”5″


Conservation Programs

The Division of Fish and Wildlife manages over 62,000 acres of Delaware land at 19 public wildlife areas that provide hunting and wildlife opportunities as well as habitat for a variety of species. The Division implements important wildlife and habitat conservation and education initiatives, like the Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program and the Delaware


Watershed Stewardship Contacts

Terry L. Deputy, Director 285 Beiser Blvd., Suite 102 Dover, DE 19904 302-739-9921
Watershed Assessment and Management 302-739-9939 Shoreline and Waterway Management 302-739-9921 Conservation Programs 302-739-9921



Delaware’s White-Tailed Deer

White-tailed deer are one of the most important wildlife species managed in Delaware. Wildlife-watchers, photographers, and hunters flock to the state in pursuit of deer. They contribute millions of dollars each year to the state’s economy.

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DNREC Wildlife Section


Chronic Wasting Disease

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) is a disease of the brain and nervous system in members of the family Cervidae (deer, elk, or moose). It has not been found in Delaware, but has in 26 other states and four Canadian provinces. State wildlife officials are taking steps to avoid its spread into Delaware. [column md=”5″


Waterfowl Surveys

Since 1974, the Division of Fish and Wildlife has conducted annual waterfowl surveys to measure long-term trends in duck and goose populations. The survey results help increase biologists’ knowledge about the state’s waterfowl populations and habitat and help the state make informed decisions about habitat management and hunting.



Coyotes in Delaware

Documented coyote sightings are not new in any of Delaware’s three counties Coyotes (Canis latrans) now makes its habitat in all 50 states but Hawaii, and they have been spotted in Delaware both north and south of the C&D Canal.



The Delaware Bat Program

Bats are one of the most mysterious and least understood groups of mammals. Discover the bats of Delaware; the species we have, how to attract or safely evict them, get information about White-Nose Syndrome, find out what the state is doing for bats, and how you can help.



Water Conservation

This approach includes recommended water conservation ideas for a drought watch and for a drought warning. It also includes planned mandatory restrictions in the case of a drought emergency. Drought watches, warnings and emergencies in Delaware are declared by the Governor. Water Use Recommendations for Drought Watch Lawn and Turf Watering (including


Division of Watershed Stewardship

The Division of Watershed Stewardship manages and protects the state’s soil, water and coastlines. It uses a comprehensive array of watershed-based programs to ensure proper stewardship of Delaware’s natural resources. The division protects and maintains the state’s shoreline and navigable waterways. It regulates changes to coastal and urban lands. It develops and implements innovative


St. Jones Reserve

The St. Jones Reserve component of the Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve (DNERR) is located on the north shore of the St. Jones River, off Kitts Hummock Road, south of Dover in Kent County and includes a portion of Delaware Bay. The St. Jones Reserve is on the Delaware Bayshore Byway and includes a Visitor Center and a two-mile nature trail.



Blackbird Creek Reserve

The Blackbird Creek Reserve component of the Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve (DNERR) is located upstream from Delaware Route 9 at Taylors Bridge in Townsend, New Castle County. The Blackbird Creek Reserve is on the Delaware Bayshore Byway and includes trails, pavilion and canoe/kayak launch.



Get Involved

You can get involved in your community and your estuary when you volunteer with the Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve (DNERR). The Reserve offers a variety of volunteer opportunities for adults and high school students throughout each year at each of its two locations.



Alvin G. Wilson Conservation Demonstration Area

The Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve actively promotes installation of conservation and restoration projects. As part of an educational outreach effort, 12 acres of poorly-drained farmland located within the St. Jones Reserve were converted in 2003 to demonstration plots to highlight wetland and grass conservation options.
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Conservation and Stewardship

Delaware Coastal Programs works with partners at the state, regional and national level to promote better stewardship of coastal habitats. Stewardship involves a wide range of activities including land acquisition, habitat mapping, ecological restoration, invasive species monitoring, resource inventories, demonstration areas, and more.

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The Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve

The Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve (DNERR) is one of 29 National Estuarine Research Reserves across the country whose goal is to


Conservation Access Pass

Delaware’s Conservation Access Pass provides needed funding to help the Division of Fish and Wildlife maintain and improve public access, facilities, and wildlife habitat on State Wildlife Areas.
Where Can You Get Yours?


Delaware Coastal Programs

The Coastal Programs Section of the Division of Climate, Coastal and Energy serves as the Department’s research, education, and policy lead for coastal and ocean issues. It helps manage Delaware’s federal coastal zone and balance the use and protection of its resources through the integrated efforts of the Delaware Coastal Management Program and Delaware National Estuarine Research


Energy Efficiency

The Division of Climate, Coastal and Energy supports energy efficiency and conservation programs that help reduce energy use and its impact on the state’s environment and public health. Every investment in energy efficiency helps increase productivity and profits for business, reduces the production of harmful greenhouse gasses, lowers energy costs, and improves the value and





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