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 Pages Tagged With: "science"

Operation Terrapin Rescue – Keeping Turtles Safe

The diamondback terrapins at Port Mahon in Kent County could use a hand during their upcoming nesting season. Learn more about how you can help.


Flooding – What You Can Do

Flood Awareness Week is May 9 to May 15, 2022. Are you prepared for flooding?


Earth Day 2022 – The Time for Bold Action on Climate Change

For Earth Day, 2022, Gov. John Carney and DNREC Sec. Shawn M. Garvin wrote an article on the need to take bold action on climate change.


Tick-Tock – The Ticks are Waiting…

By Dr. Ashley Kennedy Last April, returning home after a day of work outdoors, I loosened my hair out of my ponytail and felt a familiar but unwelcome bump on my scalp. Based on the size and location, I immediately guessed what it could be – an adult American dog tick which


PFAS – Fighting Forever Chemicals in Delaware

By Todd Keyser Beginning in the 1970s, firefighters used a special foam to put out jet fuel fires at Dover Air Force Base (DAFB). That foam figured prominently in 2006, when a C-5 cargo plane crashed just short of a runway after developing problems during takeoff. Fortunately, all 17 onboard survived the


Nourishing Delaware’s Beaches

Our beaches and dunes need protection to prevent erosion especially after severe coastal storms. Learn how DNREC works to provide beach nourishment to Delaware’s shoreline.


STEM Women of DNREC

On Feb. 11, as we mark the 7th annual International Day of Women and Girls in Science, we recognize the role of women and girls in science. At DNREC, we’re proud to celebrate our very own women scientists, engineers, biologists, directors and others in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math. Learn more about how some of them got started, their advice for girls and what they love about their work.


Coastal Research

DNREC’s Delaware Coastal Programs conducts a variety of coastal research programs to study the affects of climate change, impacts from human pollutants, and other factors impacting the changing coastal environment of Delaware.

Contact

Kari St. Laurent, Ph.D. Research Coordinator


Delaware’s Endangered Species: DNREC Keeps Today’s Wildlife from Becoming Tomorrow’s Memory

Delaware’s Endangered Species – there here are 86 animals on Delaware’s endangered species list, including the American kestrel, the northern long-eared bat and the barking tree frog.


Delaware’s Endangered Species: What DNREC’s Doing to Help

The red knot, monarch butterfly and Delmarva fox squirrel are among the nearly 100 animals on Delaware’s endangered species list. Learn more about what DNREC is doing to ensure thriving wildlife diversity in Delaware.


It’s a Big Year at DNERR

Calling all birders – experienced or not – to help the Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve have a Big Year!


Great Blue Heron Steals the Show

A photo of the iconic great blue heron took first prize in the Watersheds Photos Contest, sponsored by the DNREC Division of Watershed Stewardship.


Delaware Recycles!

America Recycles Day, November 15, is a reminder to reduce, reuse and recycle. We have some tips to help you remember how to recycle right in Delaware.


What We Do About Animal Strandings in Delaware

An endangered fin whale was spotted struggling in the waters of Cape Henlopen State Park. Both the Delaware Natural Resources Police and the Marine Education, Research & Rehabilitation Institute responded. Learn what happened and how we respond to animal strandings in Delaware.


Salt in Our Water — Saltwater Intrusion and Inundation in Delaware

“Ghost forests.” Salty-tasting well water. Saltwater intrusion is a growing issue in Delaware due to sea level rise and climate change. Here’s what DNREC is doing about it.


Nature’s Beauty – the Tony Florio Woodland Beach Wildlife Area

Photo Contest Winners! See nature’s beauty at DNREC’s Aquatic Resources Education Center near Smyrna.


The Nitty-Gritty of the Estuary

As we mark National Estuaries Week on September 18, learn more about estuaries of Delaware – unique ecosystems that many people, plants and animals call home.


Our Not So Secretive Marsh Birds

DNREC scientists are unlocking some of the mysteries of Delaware’s secretive marsh birds. Clapper rails, saltmarsh sparrows and other species are facing many challenges. How are they faring?


Snakes to Watch Out For

There are 19 species of snakes slithering around Delaware. Which ones should you watch out for and what are the best ways to avoid them?


How to Prevent Backyard Mosquitos

zzzzz … slap. Sound familiar? The whine of buzzing mosquitoes followed by swats is a tell-tale sign of summer in Delaware. There’s plenty you can do in your backyard to reduce populations of these pests. Our Mosquito Control Section has tips to share, along with the mosquitos to watch out for.


Report Atlantic Sturgeon

You can help DNREC research and manage the local population of Atlantic sturgeon, a rare and endangered fish. Simply use our reporting form to let us know of any interactions you have with this fish.
Submit a Report


On the Move – Delmarva Fox Squirrels in Delaware

Delmarva fox squirrels are rare in Delaware. Just because you haven’t seen one of these large, silver-gray, fluffy-tailed squirrels doesn’t mean you won’t – especially if you live in Sussex County. Our Division of Fish and Wildlife just moved 15 more into the area, as part of an ongoing translocation program.


Meet the Lemurs (and More!) at The Brandywine Zoo

They have long striped tails, intense eyes and they’re full of antics. Meet the lemurs – and the other animals – at the Brandywine Zoo’s new Madagascar Exhibit.


Mother’s Day in Delaware Wetlands

It’s Mother’s Day and American Wetlands Month. We thought we’d combine the two to bring you one article about some of the moms who raise their young in Delaware’s marsh areas – osprey, spring peepers and muskrats.


Breathing Easier – Delaware’s Air Quality Monitoring Network

The first week of May marks the beginning of Air Quality Awareness Week. DNREC ‘s Air Quality Monitoring Stations, located throughout the state, are helping us breathe easier.


Our Planet, Our Responsibility

Most of us do the best we can to reduce our carbon footprint by recycling more, taking more public transportation, or using less electricity to heat and cool our homes. But what else can we do? Outdoor Delaware asked our experts for a list of the best ways we can help our planet.


The Transformers

You may not have heard about them, but there are brownfields all over Delaware. They’re neither pretty nor healthy. That is, until we step in to clean them up and make way for redevelopment.


More Than a Drink of WATAR

Safer water for us, less flooding and shad returning to their spawning grounds in the Brandywine River. Our WATAR team is making it happen.


Answering the Call 24/7 – Our Emergency Response Team

Our Emergency Response Team is the state’s designated first responder for environmental emergencies. The team is on call 24/7 to respond to emergencies from oil spills to clandestine drug labs, chemical leaks, radiological incidents and many more that may occur.


Scientific Collection Permits

The Division of Fish and Wildlife issues permits to collect protected wildlife, finfish, shellfish or their nests or eggs for scientific, education or propagating purposes. Permits are issued for up to one year and may require review and approval from a relevant taxa project leader.



Microplastics: A Not So Tiny Tale

What happens to plastic after it fulfills its original purpose? Recycling gives many plastic items a second use but vast amounts are discarded and make their way into the environment. Some of this becomes microplastics. DNREC scientists are working on ways to clean them up.


Our Weatherization Assistance Program – Helping Families Reduce Energy Costs

DNREC can help even out the potentially high costs of home heating, and make a home more energy efficient, through the Weatherization Assistance Program.


Hanging with the Bats

Many of us are scared of bats. But they’re far more beneficial than harmful – and they’re not out to get us.


“Not My Trash – But I Picked It Up.”
Coastal Cleanup 2020

For 32 years, volunteers cleared tons of trash from Delaware beaches in single-day events. In 2020, to make the Coastal Cleanup accessible and safe for everyone, the effort transitioned to a month-long campaign.


Go Herpin’ — Join the Effort to Catalogue Delaware’s Reptiles and Amphibians

You can help us create the first-ever Delaware Amphibian and Reptile Atlas by submitting photos and locations of Delaware’s reptiles and amphibians, or as we call them, “herps.”


Our Own Toliara

Toliara is a radiated tortoise who lives at the Brandywine Zoo. Radiated tortoises are reptiles and considered among the most beautiful in the world. His ancestors emerged on land shortly after dinosaurs became extinct some 65 million years ago.


What About Kestrels? The Brandywine Zoo is Finding Out

The American kestrel is a pint-sized yet ferocious aerial predator notorious for taking out tree swallows or bluebirds in mid-air. About the size of a mourning dove, this raptor is the smallest and most colorful falcon in North America.


Jellyfish to Watch Out For

Are you planning to go for a swim? If so, you may encounter jellyfish because they love warm water. And there are several species of jellies you should keep a watchful eye on as you venture out for a dip.


Everything Including the Kitchen “Sink” — Delaware’s Artificial Reefs

Over 20 years, Delaware has recycled more than two million tons of rock, 100,000 tons of concrete, 86 tanks and armored personnel carriers, 1,329 retired subway cars and 27 retired vessels to create new, artificial reefs.


Electric Vehicles – On the Move in Delaware

Our relationship with electric automobiles has run hot and cold over the last 100 years, with gas-powered vehicles always winning in the end. Now people are looking for cleaner alternatives as concerns for the environment increase.


Research and Monitoring

Biologists from the Division of Fish and Wildlife keep track of the state’s fish populations. They work on Delaware’s rivers, ponds, estuaries, the Delaware Bay, and coastal waters and study how different species are faring. What Fisheries Biologists Do Fisheries Biologist John Clark captured and tagged this


About the Division of Fish and Wildlife

We Bring You Delaware’s Great Outdoors through Science and Service   What We Do Manage the state’s fish and wildlife resources. Enforce laws and regulations designed to protect and conserve these resources. Provide hunter and boater safety education programs. Provide environmental education


Environmental Lab

The Delaware Environmental Laboratory is a full-service lab that tests and assesses water, air, soil, hazardous materials, and biological samples. The lab helps monitor the water quality and biological health of Delaware’s surface waters.

Contact

Sergio Huerta, M.D. Laboratory Administrator


Delaware Bay Horseshoe Crab Spawning Survey

Citizen scientists and state researchers have surveyed the horseshoe crabs spawning along Delaware Bay beaches since 1990. The data they have collected has been key for scientists in monitoring changes in numbers of spawning crabs in the Bay.

Contact

dnerrhscsurvey@delaware.gov 302-739-6377



Fish Monitoring via Electrofisher

The Division of Fish and Wilfdlife uses electrofishing to safely sample fish populations in a variety of water bodies. Electrofishing is one of the most efficient sampling methods available to fisheries biologists. It uses an electric current to temporarily stun fish. This lets biologists sample and survey fish populations with minimal disturbance and risk to


Coastal Monitoring

DNREC’s Delaware Coastal Programs conducts long-term monitoring to help understand the coastal environment. The data collected provide insights into complex estuarine ecosystems. They help local and national leaders understand the vulnerability and resilience of our coast — and the effects of a changing climate.
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Applied Coastal Science

An extensive and dynamic applied coastal science and monitoring program provides scientific data to inform management strategies for the conservation of critical coastal resources. The current focus areas include looking at issues related to climate change and sea level rise, water quality, animal and plant life, the interface between humans and the coastal ecosystem, and more.


Report a Tagged Largemouth Bass

The Division of Fish and Wildlife monitors largemouth bass in Delaware rivers to help maintain a sustainable bass population and provide recreational fishing opportunities. Reports from anglers about the tagged bass they catch are an important part of the effort.
Bass are tagged when the Division conducts


Delaware Coastal Programs

The Coastal Programs Section of the Division of Climate, Coastal and Energy serves as the Department’s research, education, and policy lead for coastal and ocean issues. It helps manage Delaware’s federal coastal zone and balance the use and protection of its resources through the integrated efforts of the Delaware Coastal Management Program and Delaware National Estuarine Research


Understanding Climate Change

In Delaware, scientists, state agencies and local partners are working together to understand how climate change is affecting our state. What do we know about climate change and Delaware? Climate change is already affecting Delaware. Over the coming years, we can anticipate even worse effects–more days of dangerously high heat, heavier





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